Research and Clinical Information

RhinoClear Particle Size Testing

A nasal administration device like the RhinoClear Sprint may be used to deliver compounded medications for topical sinus therapy. Testing was performed in order to determine whether the RhinoClear Sprint is safe and effective for administering medicated solutions for this targeted treatment area. A major determinant of whether topical sinus therapy is safe and effective is pulmonary deposition of particles, which is determined by measuring the number of particles smaller than 10 microns. Testing showed that < 3% of the particles dispersed by the RhinoClear are smaller than 10 microns, which is considered an insignificant amount. It can be concluded that > 97% of the solution on average is deposited in the intended treatment area of the nasal passages and sinuses.

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Research on Topical Sinus Therapy

  • The Efficacy of Hypertonic Saline Nasal Irrigation for Chronic Sinonasal Symptoms.

    “Use of HSNI [Hypertonic Saline Nasal Irrigation] was frequent, well-tolerated, and met with high participant satisfaction. Clinicians should consider HSNI to be an effective adjunctive treatment for symptoms associated with chronic sinonasal symptoms.” (»View on PubMed)

    Rabago D, Pasic T, Zgierska A, Mundt M, Barrett B, Maberry R. The efficacy of hypertonic saline nasal irrigation for chronic sinonasal symptoms. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2005;133:3–8.

  • Nasal Saline Irrigations for the Symptoms of Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    “Saline irrigations are well tolerated. Although minor side effects are common, the beneficial effect of saline appears to outweigh these drawbacks for the majority of patients. The use of topical saline could be included as a treatment adjunct for the symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.” (»View on PubMed)

    Harvey R, Hannan SA, Badia L, Scadding G. Nasal saline irrigations for the symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2007; (3):1–37.

  • Use of nebulized antibiotics for acute infections in chronic sinusitis.

    “Symptomatic and endoscopic data before and after nebulized therapy showed a longer infection-free period (average, 17 weeks) compared with standard therapy (average, 6 weeks). Improvements in posterior nasal discharge, facial pain/pressure, and emotional consequences were noted.” (»View on PubMed)

    Vaughan WC, Carvalho G. Use of nebulized antibiotics for acute infections in chronic sinusitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2002;127:558–568.

  • Safety and efficacy of intranasally administered medications in the emergency department and prehospital settings.

    “Based on the published literature, intranasal administration of fentanyl, sufentanil, ketamine, hydromorphone, midazolam, haloperidol, naloxone, glucagon, and, in limited cases, flumazenil may be a safe, effective, and well-tolerated alternative to intramuscular or intravenous administration in the prehospital and ED settings.” (»View on PubMed)

    Corrigan, M., Wilson, S. S. & Hampton, J. Safety and efficacy of intranasally administered medications in the emergency department and prehospital settings. Am. J. Health-Syst. Pharm. AJHP Off. J. Am. Soc. Health-Syst. Pharm. 72, 1544–1554, doi:10.2146/ajhp140630 (2015).